If you are looking to strengthen your abdomen and pelvis as well as maintain good posture, then Pilates is for you. It also has a strong mind/body connection, so you may like it if you enjoy yoga but need a more intense core workout. Pilates is great for strengthening and toning your core and for increasing your flexibility, but it’s not a comprehensive strength building program. You will need to supplement it with some other exercises if you want to build up your arm or calf muscles.


How It Works

Pilates involves precise moves and specific breathing techniques. Pull out your gym mat and get ready to do a series of movements that will stabilise and strengthen your core. The exercises are usually done in a specific order, one right after another. The movements have names, like "The 100," Criss-Cross," the "Elephant," and the "Swan." The moves may look simple, but they take a lot of precision and control. It's not like doing a bunch of crunches; there's a strong emphasis on technique.

You’ll get stronger, more sculpted muscles and gain flexibility. You may also have better posture and a better sense of well-being. Plan on doing this workout a few days a week, in addition to cardio, since Pilates isn't aerobic. Pilates is demanding, but it's not the kind of workout that always works up a sweat. It’s all about concentration and breathing. But you’ll definitely feel it in your muscles during each exercise.

Areas It Targets

Core: Yes. Your core is the main focus of this workout.

Arms: No. This workout doesn't specifically target your arms.

Legs: Yes. You’ll use your upper legs to help engage your core.

Glutes: Yes. You’ll use your glutes as you work on moves that stabilize your core.

Back: Yes. This workout focuses on stabilizing and strengthening your back as you strengthen your abs.


Flexibility: Yes. The exercises in a Pilates workout will boost your flexibility and joint mobility. It is very beneficial to your flexibility if you already attend one of our karate classes.

Aerobic: No. This is not a cardio workout.

Strength: Yes. This workout will make your muscles stronger. You’ll use your own body weight instead of weights.

Sport: No.

Low-Impact: Yes. You’ll engage your muscles in a strong but gentle way.


5 Reasons Men Should Do Pilates

WHILE WOMEN TEND to dominate mat classes, Pilates holds plenty of benefits for men who rise to the challenge—yes, it's hard. Whether you're a powerlifter or prepping for your first marathon, a Pilates class can help fine-tune your performance. How? Exercises are made up of subtle, concentrated movements that can help you do the following:

1. Develop often neglected muscle groups. Some of your muscles, like those that dominate your daily movements, are stronger than others, and a big part of Pilates is focusing on those muscles that don't typically get a lot of attention. Pilates is similar to MAT training in that you conciously move in certain ways to build muscles that you don't hit while lifting.

2. Improve flexibility. In general, the more muscle mass you have, the less flexible you are. But Pilates' focus on stretching helps prevent injuries and muscle strains, and increases range of motion.

3. Build core strength. Every Pilates exercise focuses on using your core to power movement in your limbs. Pilates also hits your transverse abdominals, the base ab muscle under your six-pack.

4. Live more consciously. Pilates forces you to pay attention—you've got to focus on your breath while working through each movement and concentrating on proper form. After a Pilates session, you'll feel refreshed and relaxed, which can even carry over into the next day if you're lucky.

5. Have better sex. Pilates strengthens the core and the pelvic floor, and men who practice it have greater control of this region of the body--need we say more?

8 Reasons Every Woman Should Try Pilates


When it comes to Pilates, most women either are die-hard enthusiasts or have never stepped foot in a Pilates studio. Are you in the latter group? Tons of research on the benefits of Pilates would suggest you switch camps.

It Can Ease Back Pain

A stronger core equals a better back. Researchers believe that by stabilizing the core's lumbar-pelvic (lower-back) region, Pilates alleviates stress on the area and ups mobility.

It's Easy on Your Joints

Pilates' slow and controlled movements puts minimal impact on your joints.

It Hones Your Focus

Pilates urges you to focus on 1) your breath, 2) your body, and 3) how they move together. It takes a lot of concentration.

It Makes Sex Better

When Pilates instructors say, "lift your pelvic floor," what they are really saying is "do Kegels,". Pilates moves like those strengthen your pelvic floor muscles to up your pleasure in the bedroom. You have way better orgasms with Pilates. It's amazing for sex. If you're trying to conceive with all of that out-of-this-world sex, strong pelvic floor muscles can make pushing out a baby way easier.

It Improves Your Sports Performance

When you start focusing on your core, you realize that all of your muscles are connected through your core. Try doing lunges without your abdominals. You'll crumble over, With a stronger core, you can run faster, your yoga is on point, and overall, the rest of your workouts improve. Plus, by working in small groups or one-on-one with a Pilates instructor, you can learn moves that mimic and improve performance in your sport of choice.

It Makes You More Flexible

In one Brazilian study, when young women (without any prior Pilates experience) performed 20 Pilates sessions, they became 19.1 percent more flexible. When you're tight, you shorten your muscle and limit your body's range of motion. At best, that can hurt your exercise performance. At worst, it can cause injury.

It Boosts Your Brainpower

Joseph Pilates called his workout method "the thinking man's exercise." It could very well be. When Chinese researchers measured changes in women's brain activity after 10 weeks of Pilates training, they found an increase in the brain's alpha peak power, which is related to neural network activity, memory performance, and other cognitive functions. Researchers believe Pilates may even hold potential as a treatment option for people with brain-degenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunctions.



What Else You Should Know

Good for beginners? Yes. You can start with basic exercises then try advanced moves as you get better. If you’re starting out, opt for a small class or private lessons so an instructor can keep an eye on your form to help prevent an injury.

Outdoors: No. Expect to go to the gym or be in a room with a TV for this workout.

Equipment required? Yes, you’ll need to bring your own mat.


Is it good for me if I have a health condition?

You can tailor Pilates to your individual needs, so it can be a great addition to your aerobic workout, even if you have health issues like heart diseasehigh blood pressure, and cholesterol. Check with your doctor first.

If you have diabetes, you may need to make some adjustments in your diabetes treatment plan, since adding muscle mass helps your body make better use of glucose. Your doctor can tell you what changes you need to make. Tell your instructor that you have diabetes and particularly if you have any complications such as diabetic retinopathy. You may need to avoid certain Pilates moves.

If you have arthritis, a strength-training program such as Pilates is a very important part of your exercise program. Research shows that a combination of aerobic exercise and strength training can help curb symptoms, maintain balance, keep joints flexible, and help you get to and keep an ideal body weight.

If you have had a recent back or knee injury, put off Pilates until your doctor clears you. Pilates strengthens the thigh muscles (quadriceps), and this may help prevent arthritis and knee injuries. It may also help prevent greater disability if you have arthritis.

Ask your doctor if Pilates would be a good choice if you have chronic low back pain. It will help strengthen your weak core muscles that may be adding to your pain. For the best results, seek out a Pilates instructor who has at least several years of experience working with people with low back pain.


Pilates classes typically take 45 minutes to an hour.

Cost:  The price is 40 Euro for a private session or 10 euro per person for a group session per class or 50 Euro for 6 sessions.


Main Location:
Unit 2,
Greenhills Business Centre,
Greenhills Road,
Tallaght, Dublin 24

Other Location:
MYD Youth Club,
Apollo Business Park,
Dundrum, Dublin 14

Phone: +353 (0) 852 701 039
Email: info@kickfit.ie